family history and genealogy

Author: Andy Kubrin (Page 3 of 6)

Andy Kubrin writes about family history with a relish for the offbeat, comic, and absurd. In bracingly original language, he traces the lives of his forebears in finely detailed character studies, ever watchful for their shrewdness, eccentricity, and the larger historical significance of their goings-on. Drawing on recorded interviews, photographs, memorabilia, and published account, he crafts an unforgettable chronicle that takes the full measure of his family’s tragedy, dysfunction, and greatness. Andy Kubrin holds an MFA from Bennington College. His work has appeared in The Florida Review and Fourth Genre. He lives in Calgary, Alberta.

What Is Memory?

Memories & Souvenirs by ThunderchildAllen

A few weeks ago, while writing about my “discovery” of my great-grandfather Isadore Katz’s birthplace of Várpalánka, I made a mistake. I wrote at the time that my family had not lost anyone in the Holocaust, but this statement was incorrect. I learned about my error several days later, when my mother reminded me of some earlier conversations we had had on the topic.
Continue reading

Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay

As I move more deeply into the effort of writing a family history, I find myself reading more widely in the genre. You can’t work without taking stock of the precedents in your line. To write a family history, I have to come to grips with the genre itself, to learn lessons from those who have come before me and to keep up with current offerings. So today I set up a new blog category, Readings, to capture my thoughts on other family histories. Christopher Benfey’s Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay is the first entry in this category. There will be others. Continue reading

Why I Write About My Extended Family

My extended family, circa 1968

I can find no rule stating that a memoir about family must focus on the writer’s immediate family, but the custom seems to be widely observed. Parents and siblings occupy the foreground. Aunts, uncles, and grandparents take up their positions in a dim and sketchy background. The family tableau appears in this configuration as if no other grouping were possible.  But in writing and in life, anything is possible. So why does the genre adhere so rigidly to this form? Continue reading

Microhistory

Douglas Fairbanks at third Liberty Loan rally HD-SN-99-02174

Douglas Fairbanks at third Liberty Loan rally. By Paul Thompson [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons


For some time now, I have been working under the assumption that family history and memoir require some sort of framework to guide the writing. It’s fine to rummage in your store of memory and reflect on the life you have lived. It’s also fine to research your family tree and trace your line of descent from your earliest known ancestor.

But without a theoretical framework, how can you craft a powerful and memorable account? How can you support your idea of the human? How can you justify the words you set down? Continue reading

Joseph and Edith

My great-grandparents, Joseph and Edith Letwin

Some months ago, I wrote a post about my great-grandparents Harry and Tillie Kubrin, the forebears of our line on the Kubrin side. That post started out as a primer on family history craft, but something drew me inexorably to the subject of Harry and Tillie, and I quickly veered off-message. Great-grandparents must be inherently colorful. Just ask Russ Livingston, who recently wrote this post about his great-grandparents. Continue reading

Looking for Várpalánka

Hungary and Ukraine (courtesy of National Geographic Education MapMaker Interactive)

It’s been some time since I actively engaged in genealogical research. It’s not that I’ve lost interest in the topic. My family history project has simply entered another phase, and interviews, transcription, and planning take up most of my time nowadays.

This week, however, I decided to try out JewishGen.org, a site specializes in genealogy for people with Jewish ancestry. I’m glad I did. In just one day, the site cleared up a little mystery about my family that has lingered for generations. Continue reading

Writing About Living People—Personal Issues

Writing about living people raises a host of legal, personal, and literary issues. If these complications escape your notice while you’re in the throes of writing, try flipping through a family album sometime. Resist the undertow of sentimentality and nostalgia and instead consider the people you see as changeable human beings, with relationships with each other and a relationship with you.

How do you write about your relatives while taking all this complexity fully into account? How do you write about them—truthfully and candidly—without disturbing these relationships? Continue reading

« Older posts Newer posts »

© 2022 Andy Kubrin

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑